Taizé

taize

Mel Soriano

Taizé services have meant so much to many of us here at All Saints Pasadena. It amazes me that we get to worship together weekly instead of just periodically like at other places.

I first came across Taizé and found that the music was engaging and easy to learn. At first, I found the silent meditation in a group setting to be difficult (I get antsy) but I’ve learned to enjoy the community prayer.

In the mid-2000s, after almost two decades, I experienced a significant change to my personal life at home. I was depressed and felt as though the Holy Spirit had forgotten who I was. I even took a sabbatical from choir, which normally gave me great joy but instead reminded me that I was unhappy.

But I continued to attend Taizé services. I sat in silence, not really singing. I listened. And I wept. If you haven’t attended, all are invited to sit at the cross in the center of the chapel to touch it or lay your forehead upon it. We’re invited to leave our burdens and pains on the cross, symbolically leaving them for the Christ who will help us carry them.

And in time I was healed. I left my pain to the Christ who loves us. And in singing the lyrics to certain hymns (such as “Within our darkest night, you kindle the fire that never dies away”), I was reminded that I was never alone. Indeed, the Holy Spirit was just giving me room and time to grow into the person I’m supposed to be.

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