Lenten Meditations

Lenten Meditations

Lenten Meditation: February 20

by Jenny Tisi

Recently, I was asked to do an assignment that is taking a lot of thought. I am to think of myself in 1995 and then think of myself in 2015. I was to think about labels for myself for both years. It called to mind a lot of quotes, but this one from Marianne Williamson fit it best: “You must learn a new way to think before you can master a new way to be.”

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Lenten Meditation: February 19

by Bob Hunter

The Helpless God

The love of God is a rich and wonderful reality to be able to take in as much as humanly possible. The good news, of course, is that God’s love is limitless so we are able to drink from that well of living water for our entire lives. This love/water is for all of us and it really does not matter who we are, what we’ve done or haven’t done, what our family tree looks like, what friends we keep, who we hang with, what we’re struggling with, the amount of money we control or don’t control, etc.

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Lenten Meditation: February 18

by Susan Russell

The outward and visible signs of the shift into the Lenten season that began with the ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday continue with the hymns we sing and the prayers we pray through the forty days until Easter. One of my favorites is from the Eucharistic Prayer we use during Lent — with its challenge to claim “wilderness time” as both redemptive and liberating.

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Lenten Meditations

Lenten Meditation: February 17

by Bob Hunter

Have you chosen your Lenten practice yet? The usual thought that comes to mind for many of us when someone says “Lent” is giving up something. You know the list: chocolate, cigarettes, over eating, cursing, speeding, movies, etc., etc., etc. “The Lenten list” can be as numerous as there are people. And I’m not making light of the value of this kind of list. Especially if cigarettes are on the list. OK, I’ll quit meddling.

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Lenten Meditation: February 16

by Jenny Tisi

“What are you giving up for Lent?” Just like last year, one of my choristers asked me this question. She said she has never given up anything for Lent. I grew up with the traditional give ups – junk food, swearing, lying, etc. As an adult, I really never gave up anything for Lent. Instead, I have focused on taking something up, which in turn, makes it so that I am giving something up.

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Lenten Meditation: February 15

by Jim Loduha

One of my spiritual gurus over the years has been Henri Nouwen, and on this, the 6th day of Lent, Nouwen draws our attention to the concept of courage. Courage takes many forms: standing up for marginalized people, offering love to one’s enemies, helping lift families out of poverty, to name just a few examples.

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Lenten Meditation: February 13

by Susan Russell

“Remember that you are stardust and to stardust you shall return” was a meme that caught my eye on Ash Wednesday … and reminded me of this poem by Joyce Rupp:

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Lenten Meditation: February 12

by Laura Thornton

Some children love to color Jesus green and others love to color Jesus purple. There are lots of creative minds in the pews on Sunday morning and when they grab the coloring page for that day and a box of crayons, I want to make sure their creative energy is happy. So, for the kids who want to color Jesus and other people with actual people colors we have the amazing world of multicultural crayons.

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Lenten Meditation: February 11

by Jon Dephouse

This coming weekend marks three years since I finished cancer treatment, which is a moment for me of remembering my own mortality. The other night I shared my spiritual journey to the new member class and after talking about my story one person asked me what that the struggle of cancer treatment did to my faith.

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Lenten Meditations: Ash Wednesday

by Anne Peterson

Ashes—made from burned palm fronds from … a reminder of the finite reality of our lives. Kneeling at the altar to receive the cross of ashes on my forehead is a moving moment for me—more-so now that I have entered yet another decade of life. The ceremony is a wake-up call, not unlike New Year’s, without the football. Where am I now? What do I want to do in the world at this point in time?

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