Stories

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Lenten Meditation: Day Twenty-Six

Nearly ten years have gone by since mother Teresa passed away. Today I want to share with you one of her beautiful writings. May your heart be filled knowing that our creator thirsts for you and loves you through and through. – Jim Loduha

I Thirst For You, by Mother Teresa

I know you through and through – I know everything about you. The very hairs of your head I have numbered. Nothing in your life in unimportant to me, I have followed you through the years, and I have always loved you – even in your wanderings.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Twenty-Five

For many, Lent is an opportunity to fast, to completely stop or do less of that “thing” that we know it is hard for us to stay away from. In doing so, we do some kind of penance and aim to be more self-reflective about our behavior in the recent past (usually since the last season of Lent). 

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Lenten Meditation: Day Twenty-Four

As we continue our forty day journey to Easter through the wilderness of this Lenten season, we bid your prayers for the Church in general and for our Diocese of Los Angeles in specific.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Twenty-One

On Being Kneaded and Becoming Needed

It’s interesting how Lent can trigger past memories long forgotten. Of course, the triggering could be attributed to several things. For me, it could be that I recently spent time with my sister’s family and other relatives in Florida, where I grew up. As a child, one of my fondest memories was awakening to the smell of freshly baked bread.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Twenty

Lent a Great Time for: Confession?

This past week I was able to talk about confession in Children’s Chapel as well as the service I’m a part of at the Pasadena Police Station memorializing the life of a young black father who was murdered by the Pasadena Police Department.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Nineteen

In February I had the opportunity to visit the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC. One of the major exhibitions was called “Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World.” It focused on several indigenous philosophies about the creation and order of the universe, and the spiritual relationship people share with the natural world.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Eighteen

Reading Greek mythology was my favorite as a pre-teen. There was Artemis, the virgin goddess of the hunt. The patron goddess of Athens and the Greek goddess of wisdom, was Athena. She was an active participant in the Trojan War, where one of my heroes, Achilles died. I was fascinated by the labors of Heracles. While I didn’t initially grasp the story of Icarus, who flew too close to the sun, I somehow discerned that his story was far more than entertainment.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Seventeen

Flowers are often gifted as an expression of love and friendship, gratitude or celebration. Just think about the last time someone gave you flowers. Wasn’t it fun, surprising and exhilarating? It is amazing how the simple gesture of being given flowers can make us feel so much and how we can look at the them resting in their vase in our home or office – and feel … so blessed. Why do we all too often, wait, to be gifted flowers?

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Lenten Meditation: Day Fifteen

Lessons from Joseph

The Old Testament lesson for this Friday in the second week of Lent is found in the book of Genesis and may be very familiar to many of you. It’s the beginning of the story of Joseph, his father and his brothers and tells how Joseph ends up in a pit because of jealousy, insecurity and hatred.

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Lenten Meditation: Day Fourteen

I’ve always been much more of a Advent/Christmas Christian than a Lent/ Easter one. The waiting in the darkness of Advent, the Incarnation – God breaking into the universe – what a trip! The whole lent/Easter thing: much harder for me. For most of my life, all it took was for me to hear “take up your cross,” and I’m heading for the hills. I don’t want to be weighed down with suffering and sorrow, I don’t like to think of Jesus that way either.

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